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Lima Senior High School senior Derek Snider has played the trumpet since the fifth grade. He recently auditioned for the competitive junior drum and bugle corps and was offered a lead part immediately following the audition. Submitted photo.

staff reports
news@the419.com

LIMA – Lima Senior High School senior Derek Snider spent most of his summer rehearsing and then traveling more than 10 states with the Legends Drum and Bugle Corps.

Lima Senior High School senior Derek Snider spent most of his summer rehearsing and then traveling more than 10 states with the Legends Drum and Bugle Corps. Submitted photo.

Snider traveled to more than 10 states with the Legends Drum and Bugle Corps this summer. Submitted photo.

Snider, who has played the trumpet since the fifth grade, auditioned for the competitive junior drum and bugle corps and was offered a lead part immediately following the audition. He was also selected to be part of the eight-person Legends Brass Ensemble. The ensemble performed the National Anthem at the beginning of each show.

Legends, in its 10th year, is based on Kalamazoo, Mich. This year’s 108-member group spent three weeks in 12-hour rehearsal days. They then traveled around the Midwest performing 26 shows.

The performances were also competitions. Legends did its best ever this year, finishing 25th in the world class division and fifth in the open class. The brass line earned third place in the open class. The ranking earned Legends the opportunity to close out the season performing in Lucas Oil Stadium, where the NFL’s Indianapolis Colts play.

Snider’s older brother, Aaron, was in the group in 2011, and his grandfather, Monty Hamilton, also performed in a similar group. Snider is the son of Tina Hamilton Shoemaker and Jeff Shoemaker.

Snider is a member of the Spartan Marching Pride and other school bands and sings in the Masterworks Choir, Scarlet and Grey show choir and Spartanaires. He is a member of the National Honor Society, DECA marketing program, and is on the Spartan golf and tennis teams.

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News articles from the 419 in Lima, Ohio

staff reports
news@the419.com

LIMA – On August 21, 2015 a planned shutdown of operations will occur at the PCS Nitrogen facility near Lima, Ohio. The shutdown, which has been scheduled to complete capital improvements and plant maintenance, is expected to last approximately 7 weeks.

This project will be one of the most comprehensive in the history of the Lima operation. The company has invested over $350 million dollars in capital and maintenance spending over the past two years with this outage being the second of two planned outages. During the shutdown period the company estimates approximately 1,200 additional contract personnel will be on site to assist in completing the capital projects and maintenance activities. This project is estimated to result in additional local spending of approximately $6 million dollars.

The company typically plans such shutdowns every four to five years for the execution of inspections and repairs as part of our dedication to the safety of personnel and communities, protection of the environment and to maintain continuous reliable operation of the plant. PCS Nitrogen’s management would like to make local residents aware that an elevated noise level occurs during both the shutdown and startup of the facility.

Accordingly, a higher noise level will be experienced for a period of time during the beginning of October when the site resumes operations. Increased traffic can also be expected along Buckeye and Fort Amanda Roads during this shutdown.

About Potash Corp.
As the world’s largest crop nutrient company, PotashCorp plays an integral role in global food production. The company produces the three essential nutrients required to help farmers grow healthier, more abundant crops. With global population rising and diets improving in developing countries, crop nutrients such as potash, phosphates and nitrogen offer a responsible and practical solution to help produce the food we need, from the land we have.

PCS Nitrogen Ohio, L.P. (PotashCorp Lima) makes nitrogen products for agricultural and industrial uses. We are a proud member of the Lima region, employing more than 150 people and contributing locally through purchasing and community investments.

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To prevent caMRSA, remind your student athlete not to share towels, clothing, or other items. Photo: Fotolia.com

By Sue Hubbard, M.D.
kidsdr.com

I’ve been seeing a lot of skin infections and many of them are due to community acquired methicillin resistant staph areus (caMRSA). The typical patient may be a teen involved in sports, but I also see this infection in young children in day care or summer camp.

The typical history is, “I think I have a spider bite,” a statement that makes my ears perk up because it’s one of the most common complaints with a staph infection – which is typically not due to a bite at all.

Frankly, how many spiders have you seen lurking around your house waiting to pounce? The caMRSA bacteria is ubiquitous and penetrates small micro-abrasions in the skin without any of us ever knowing it. The typical caMRSA infection presents with a boil or pustule that grows rapidly and is very tender, red and warm to the touch.

For most pediatricians, you can see a lesion and know that it is staph. It’s most common to see such lesions in athletes on exposed skin surfaces such as arms and legs, but lesions are also common on the buttocks of children who are in diapers in day care. The affected area is angry-looking and tender. A teenage boy I saw the other day with caMRSA would not sit in the chair. He was so uncomfortable he preferred to lie on the examining table, on his side.

If the lesion is pustular, the doctor should obtain a culture to determine which bacteria is causing the infection, but in most cases in my office, culture comes back as caMRSA.

In most cases, these infections can be treated with an oral antibiotic, such as clindamycin or trimethoprim-sulfa. Many lesions improve dramatically once the site is drained and cultured. Let me reiterate that, if possible, you should have your doctor obtain a culture to pinpoint the exact bacteria causing the infection.

To prevent caMRSA, remind your student athlete not to share towels, clothing, or other items. Make sure common areas are disinfected and encourage good hand washing. The closing of schools or disinfecting an entire football field or area with turf is not recommended.

Lastly, only an antibiotic for a bacterial infection, as overuse of antibiotics leads to resistance.


(Dr. Sue Hubbard is an award-winning pediatrician, medical editor and media host. “The Kid’s Doctor” TV feature can be seen on more than 90 stations across the U.S. Submit questions at http://www.kidsdr.com. The Kid’s Doctor e-book, “Tattoos to Texting: Parenting Today’s Teen,” is now available from Amazon and other e-book vendors.)

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